ESPN Baselessly Attacks Dominican Citizenship Laws

A recent ESPN article decided to touch upon the tired and overly exaggerated allegations of ethnic cleansing going on down in the Dominican Republic, this time with a baseball twist. 

There is some good writing mixed into the whole media-fueled Dominican/Haitian debacle. The open border agenda has decided to resurface just as the World Baseball Classic tournament started to heat up... talk about impeccable timing, it's like a broken record, regurgitating the same lie repeated by more than 20 other hacks. And here we are to obliterate it, once again. 

In the ESPN article, Mr. Schoenfeld stands on his soap box and proclaims that many great Haitian baseball players will never leave the Island due to discrimination and a violent history of racism attributed to the legacy of Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, former dictator of the Republic. 

In reality, the ESPN writer's whole argument has more to do with negligence and lack of documentation than with Trujillo's influence. Mr. Schoenfeld alleges that the number of ethnic Haitians playing as Dominicans would be a shocker to many, and that may be the case in his mind, but I'm sure Dominicans are well aware of this debacle. 

Like many are well aware, San Pedro De Macoris, which the author mentions, is where many immigrants from the West Indies came to work in the sugar fields prior to the Haitians in the early 1900's; and they were known as "cocolos." 

If Mr. Schoenfeld was a thorough journalist, he would have done some more research. Instead, he claims it was the Cubans who came to work the sugar fields and brought baseball to the country. In reality, there was an immense number of immigrants who came to D.R. back then, not just Cubans. 

While some of what Mr. Schoenfeld says holds some truth, he withholds many truths at the same time: like the fact that the Dominicans did offer a regularization plan for Haitians born in the Dominican Republic, while at the same time trying to combat a massive non-stop wave of illegal Haitians not born in the Dominican Republic from overwhelming the country's resources. 

All the while a supposedly vicious ethnic cleansing campaign is ongoing, what is in fact created is a giant, unorganized quagmire for the Dominicans to have to sort through, and writers like this man feel entitled to say what it is and how it is. 

If an individual is up to bat on writing about something like this, then at least put everything on the table, don't bring Trujillo into this like every other unoriginal writer who touches the topic. Dominicans had to deal with racist, genocidal maniacs like Trujillo from the other side of the island as well. 

However, that might be too far back in history for the ESPN writer, if he was thorough he would have noted that and not been biased by painting Dominicans as the aggressors, when in reality Dominicans we're always on guard due to the many attempted invasions from the Haitian side. 

Also, just because Mr. Schoenfeld tried to personalize a situation like the one on the island, using athletes as his power point, it still doesn't change the fact that the problem is a lot bigger than 30,000 "ethnic Haitians," while Dominicans suspect there may be more than 2 million "non-ethnic Haitians" mixing in and creating a chaotic environment. 

For instance, Dominican hospitals are being devastated by illegal Haitians, not ethnic Haitians, and with such gems in his article like, "you can get papers from somebody," or birth certificates at the age of 10 one has to ponder if this man is so naive that he doesn't see that there is a fake documents crisis on the island?

There is no doubt that Mr. Schoenfeld sees the document crisis, however the copy and paste victim narrative is far more seductive click bait. 

As far as baseball goes, it is a big thing in the Dominican Republic, like soccer is a big thing in Haiti. The Haitians themselves have never properly documented their migrants, however, and the blame usually goes to the Dominican government. And what about the U.N after the earthquake and many other so-called foundations and NGO's who were there to relieve so much suffering, only leaving behind more broken dreams and cholera. 

It's easy to justify and blame Dominicans since it surely takes away attention from all the "heroic" American efforts to help rebuild Haiti which never really manifested. The way many Dominicans see it, Haitians and Haiti are not their responsibility and there is only so much they can do. Sometimes the truth is stranger than fiction and even with all the bad blood, Dominicans have done way more for Haiti than any self-righteous writer who left his ivory tower to visit the Island and interview baseball players.
 
By: El Conde

After Two Years In Leiden, I Can Safely Say the People are Strange

Yalies didn't hang out with "townies" when I was studying there. I suppose the "townies" simply saw themselves as African Americans, and all of us as super-rich, smug smart people. While walking around Leiden, where the top university in the Netherlands is located, I can safely say that this is a uni city, and that the people have been trained to see themselves as "townies."

Since Leiden University has been around for longer than many families here, most people simply remember that that has always been there. And because Dutch people are into assimilation, this means that some families moved here expecting to assimilate into the university culture.

But there is simply no possible entry for a local person from outside of an elite university into a social circle of students; a person's only choice is to assimilate by observation, and from what I can observe, people prefer not to smile or recognize each other on the street.

I imagine that if you're an 18-year-old Dutch kid from a village of a few hundred people and you move to Leiden to study, you're going to be warned by your parents to "stay safe in the big city, and to get to know the other students."

The "townies" have for centuries been trained by super-smart kids from villages that they are invisible, and because the king studied here, then they know that they are particularly invisible. I sometimes feel as if the people were once near-sighted or blind and simply walked the streets fearing for their lives that they could trip or confuse people for someone else.

And that's what I feel is the culture here in Leiden: a place where people behave as if they're near-sighted and fearing an accident.

Seth Rich Killed by Scalia's Assassin: Source

Murdered for telling the truth.
Abreu Report has received terrifying information: the person responsible for killing Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is the same man who brutally murdered Seth Rich, and he's still roaming the United States, plotting against his next target.

Last year, Abreu Report was the first on the scene reporting on the suspicious nature of  Justice Scalia's death, with our groundbreaking investigation being analyzed by even the Taiwanese media as it was irrefutably established that the most powerful conservative judge in the United States was killed for planning to reveal who was responsible for the 9/11 attacks.


And now the people who plunged the US into the longest war in American history have decided that yet more loyal citizens can be eliminated, with even President Trump's life at risk.

Seth Rich was brutally gunned down in the streets of Washington DC, and the shadow state took him out to prove a point: that anyone who talks can be taken out anywhere with impunity. 

The deep state continues burying evidence that could help find the man responsible for killing two of America's most important patriots of the 21st century, and we all have to fear that they will continue killing again with absolute impunity.

The Day I Was Put on Trial

I studied at Yale University, but the day most seared into my memory is not the day when I graduated: it is the day when a court in the Netherlands decided to put me on trial. I was acquitted on all counts, since I was not the person responsible, but my signature set into motion all of the events which led to me sitting before that judge and confessing my sins while explaining who I was: a poor young man who didn't understand the power of his signature.

When I walk the streets of the Netherlands today, I sometimes only think of that judge, and of me having to tell her that I was on Social Security in the Bronx, and that I was the orphaned, illegitimate son of an adopted supermarket bagboy. I confessed my dead father's biggest shame, and I did it before people who look like the professors here in Leiden, people I will see on a daily basis.

I confessed to knowledge of a crime and yet I walk the streets a man without even a fine to his name, often feeling compelled to tell people that I feel like a criminal.

Will my signature be one day judged here?
In 2013, the Netherlands made it illegal to teach someone to grow cannabis using more than 200 lamps because they found a Cannabis College certificate attributed to me inside of an Amsterdam grow-op and figured that it would be used for my defense in court, as I had been a teacher in Korea and simply moved there trusting that I would be engaging in a legitimate enterprise.

The Netherlands will eventually legalize cannabis as it becomes an irreversibly multi-cultural country that embraces the international community, drifting away from its current gray laws, but I will always be one of those men who can say: "I was put on trial for bootlegging during prohibition."